Servant King – Week 1 – The Beginning of the Gospel

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January 8, 2017

Servant King – Week 1 – The Beginning of the Gospel

Servant King – Week 1 – The Beginning of the Gospel


NOTE:  Unfortunately the Audio Recording is not complete but the notes are.  


Servant King LogoMark 1:1-20
The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God, 2 as it is written in Isaiah the prophet:
“I will send my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way” 3 “a voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him.’”
4 And so John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 5 The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to him. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River. 6 John wore clothing made of camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And this was his message: “After me comes the one more powerful than I, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. 8 I baptize you withwater, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”
9 At that time Jesus came from Nazareth in Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 Just as Jesus was coming up out of the water, he saw heaven being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. 11 And a voice came from heaven: “You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.”
12 At once the Spirit sent him out into the wilderness, 13 and he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was with the wild animals, and angels attended him.
14 After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. 15 “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!
16 As Jesus walked beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen.17 “Come, follow me,” Jesus said, “and I will send you out to fish for people.” 18 At once they left their nets and followed him. 19 When he had gone a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John in a boat, preparing their nets. 20 Without delay he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men and followed him.

Author – ?? probably – John Mark  –
Act 12:12, 25; 15:37
Mom’s house was meeting place for the Christians in Jerusalem
Might have been there at the arrest of Jesus
Barnabus was His cousin. Col 4:10
second chance, Gospel reminds us
Source – Peter (1 Pet 5:13 – led him to Christ-discipled Him)
Audience – Roman Christians,  translates words for the reader, uses Latin terms in place of Greek ones,
Purpose – Record the what Jesus Did. (topical narrative – not necessarily chronological) Mixes the teaching with the action of Jesus to show how his actions backed up his words.  Miracles are prominent
Key verse: 10:45
Key word – euthus – immediately, straightaway
9 out 37 parables but 18 of 35 miracles the most of all the Gospels  (http://www.marypages.com/MiraclesJesus.htm)
Jesus as a servant on the move, instantly responsive to the will of the father.
Mark (/peter) was concerned with action.  The book of mark stresses what Jesus did.
Date  55-65 ad ~ 60 ad  Why is it listed second in the canon?

1 The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God,
The Beginning (Gen 1:1)
– beginning, origin
– the first place, principality, rule, magistracy
Good news = Gospel
Subject – Jesus
Title and Purpose – Christ – The Messiah – LIT annointed one (Not His last name)
Authority – Son of God vs. Son of David
Son of God is pointing to His power and authority which He displays through His words and works.
Mark is largely divided into two ideas,
  • Jesus as Messiah,  The annointed one.  The servant
  • Jesus the Son of God,  The one with authority, The King
Hence, the title of this series:  Servant King
2 as it is written in Isaiah the prophet: “I will send my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way”— 3 “a voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him.’”
Prophets foretold of His coming, Isaiah and Malachi are both referenced here.
In ancient times, before a king visited any part of his realm, a messenger was sent before him to prepare the way. This included both repairing the roads and preparing the people.
Mark wastes no time here with genealogies or any theological constructs. He just says here it is.
4 And so John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 5 The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to him. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River.6 John wore clothing made of camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And this was his message: “After me comes the one more powerful than I, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. 8 I baptize you withwater, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”
John is declared as fulfilling these prophecies.
Our tendency is to want to make John’s character like that of a modern man. That will not work. He was not the kind of man to be a presidential cabinet member; rather, he was a wandering preacher who lived in the wilderness. God chose a forerunner entirely different from the type we would have picked. Mark helps us take a straight and honest look at this man. Not only does he appear unusual by today’s standards; he was unusual by the standards of his own day. He had no credentials, had not studied in a formal school with Pharisees or rabbis, and wore funny clothes and ate weird food!
Humble in appearance ? He wore a camel-haired garment with a leather belt. Sounds like Elijah in 2 Kings 1:8.
Humble in home ? He lived in the desert.
Humble in diet ? He ate locusts (a clean animal; Lev 11:22) and honey. At least it was high in protein and minerals.
Humble in message ? John effectively said, “One greater than me is coming [v. 7]. He is so great, I am not worthy to do what only a Gentile slave would do [v. 7]. My baptism is outward with water: a symbol. His baptism is inward with the Spirit: the real thing [v. 8]. The One who is coming is mightier than I am! He is more worthy than I am! He is more powerful than I am! I have touched your body with water. He will touch your soul with the Holy Spirit! I know who I am in God’s plan. I know who He is in God’s plan too!”
John would not live to 35. He would be imprisoned and beheaded. The world, no doubt, scoffed at this crazy man. Heaven, however, would smile.
J. C. Ryle “The principal work of every faithful minister of the gospel, is to set the Lord Jesus fully before His people, and to show them His fullness and His power to save. The next great work He has to do, is to set before them the work of the Holy Spirit, and the need of being born again, and inwardly baptized by His grace. These two mighty truths appear to have been frequently on the lips of John the Baptist. It would be well for the church and the world, if there were more ministers like him.” (Ryle, Mark , 4)
But John’s humility is nothing compared to Jesus’.  Jesus displays His humility through the rest of the book by His constant obedience to the will of the Father.  The first act of obedience of Jesus is His baptism.
9 At that time Jesus came from Nazareth in Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 Just as Jesus was coming up out of the water, he saw heaven being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. 11 And a voice came from heaven: “You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.”
Here we see the first use of Mark’s favorite word euthus – immediately, straightaway.  Just As Jesus was coming out of the Water.  Mark always emphasize the immediacy of our response to God.
God’s first words here in Mark are powerful but When we hear this phrase we think of it in our own context.  Often many of us longed to hear those words from our own fathers.  Or even from God our Heavenly Father.  But there was a much deeper meaning that Jesus most definitely heard.  You see those words from the Father most likely brought to mind another prophecy by Isaiah Turn to
Isa. 42:1-4
1 Here is my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen one in whom I delight; I will put my Spirit on him, and he will bring justice to the nations.
2 He will not shout or cry out, or raise his voice in the streets.
3 A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out. In faithfulness he will bring forth justice;
4 he will not falter or be discouraged till he establishes justice on earth. In his teaching the islands will put their hope.
This passage begins a series of prophecies about the suffering servant (Jesus) that last all the way through to Chapter 55, encompassing the most powerful chapter of Isaiah 53.  When Jesus heard those words it no doubt was a powerful reminder that He was about to begin His ministry and knowing that the Father was calling Him to be the servant of all men.  It was as if God Himself was saying “I believe in you!  I know you can do what I am calling you to do.”  The Lord speaks those same words to us today.  As He calls us He promises to be with us and empower us.
12 At once the Spirit sent him out into the wilderness, 13 and he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was with the wild animals, and angels attended him.
At once Mark uses His favorite word again.  Literally it says immediately the Spirit cast Jesus into the wilderness to be tested.  Mark does not spend long on this idea but His mention of wild animals must have reminded the Christians of Rome of the wild animals they were facing in the persecution of the church in Rome.  As they were being used in the Colosseum in Roman.
14 After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. 15 “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!
There is the word repent. Now repentance is not so easy as sometimes we think. The Greek word metanoia (Greek #3341) literally means a change of mind. We are very apt to confuse two things–sorrow for the consequences of sin and sorrow for sin. Many a man is desperately sorry because of the mess that sin has got him into, but he very well knows that, if he could be reasonably sure that he could escape the consequences, he would do the same thing again. It is not the sin that he hates; it is its consequences.
16 As Jesus walked beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen.17 “Come, follow me,” Jesus said, “and I will send you out to fish for people.” 18 At once they left their nets and followed him. 19 When he had gone a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John in a boat, preparing their nets. 20 Without delay he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men and followed him.
Come Follow me is not an offer or even an invitation.  It is a command to be met either with obedience or disobedience.  It is a call they can respond to or to ignore.  Andrew and Peter, respond “immediately”.
“The time has come” are Jesus’ first words in the Gospel of Mark (Mk 1:15). In any well told story, the opening words of the central character sets the tone and direction for the rest of the narrative. And when Jesus announces that the “Time” has come.  Mark uses the Greek word Kairos, which refers to the supreme moment, as opposed to chronos, or a sequential time.  This is the ultimate moment in time.  Jesus has come and issued his call, his command, If you and I are engaged in listening to the Gospel of Mark, we will take our places beside Peter, Andrew, James and John and decide, in the framework of this supreme moment, how we will respond.   Will we respond to the call of God to Follow Him, immediately?

For more from this series you can CLICK HERE.

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